How To Design A Japanese Garden

How To Design A Japanese Garden

A Japanese garden represents traditional Japanese style and can be designed and installed in neighbourood parks and private homes. Western gardens occasionally reproduces some of the features of a Japanese garden.

When designing a Japanese garden, keep in mind that it should contain the real or symbolic elements such as water, an island, a connecting bridge to that island, a stone lantern and a pavilion or a teahouse.

Properly designed Japanese gardens can be classified as gardens which can be viewed with pleasure, from a building or while sitting on a veranda, gardens to be viewed from a boa and garden, which can be viewed from a path leading to a tea ceremony hut.

A “dry landscape” (Karesansui) type Japanese garden contains no water and few plants, still they invoke an atmosphere of water, which is created by using pebbles and sand or raked gravel. Rocks with their intriguing patterns and shapes, mosses and small and low shrubs are extensively used in designing this type of Japanese gardens.

In addition, Japanese black pine and other evergreens, bamboos and related plants form part of the Japanese garden. Mosses and ferns are also used to create an atmosphere imitating water.

Japanese gardens are designed for multiple purposes providing a place for relaxation, recreation and for an exhibition of unusual rocks and rare specimens of plants.

Observers are taken through each unique area of strolling gardens through a premeditated path, which is one of the styles of Japanese garden. To make the strollers look down at particular points, in specific spaces, uneven surfaces are placed. When the stroller looks up, they will feast on an eye-catching decoration. This type of design and decoration is known as the Japanese landscape’s “hide and reveal” principle. The spirit of the observer is enlightened and revived by these surprise elements.

In the design of Japanese Garden, walkways, bridges and paths play an important part. When an actual mountain is not present or viewable, stones are placed in the Japanese gardens to represent mountains.

The grouping of stones in the Japanese garden is placed in such as way to reflect triangular shapes. Source of water in a Japanese garden should form part of the natural surrounding and lanterns are placed near them to represent male and female part of the elements fire and water.

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How To Design A Japanese Garden

How To Design A Japanese Garden

A Japanese garden represents traditional Japanese style and can be designed and installed in neighbourood parks and private homes. Western gardens occasionally reproduces some of the features of a Japanese garden.

When designing a Japanese garden, keep in mind that it should contain the real or symbolic elements such as water, an island, a connecting bridge to that island, a stone lantern and a pavilion or a teahouse.

Properly designed Japanese gardens can be classified as gardens which can be viewed with pleasure, from a building or while sitting on a veranda, gardens to be viewed from a boa and garden, which can be viewed from a path leading to a tea ceremony hut.

A “dry landscape” (Karesansui) type Japanese garden contains no water and few plants, still they invoke an atmosphere of water, which is created by using pebbles and sand or raked gravel. Rocks with their intriguing patterns and shapes, mosses and small and low shrubs are extensively used in designing this type of Japanese gardens.

In addition, Japanese black pine and other evergreens, bamboos and related plants form part of the Japanese garden. Mosses and ferns are also used to create an atmosphere imitating water.

Japanese gardens are designed for multiple purposes providing a place for relaxation, recreation and for an exhibition of unusual rocks and rare specimens of plants.

Observers are taken through each unique area of strolling gardens through a premeditated path, which is one of the styles of Japanese garden. To make the strollers look down at particular points, in specific spaces, uneven surfaces are placed. When the stroller looks up, they will feast on an eye-catching decoration. This type of design and decoration is known as the Japanese landscape’s “hide and reveal” principle. The spirit of the observer is enlightened and revived by these surprise elements.

In the design of Japanese Garden, walkways, bridges and paths play an important part. When an actual mountain is not present or viewable, stones are placed in the Japanese gardens to represent mountains.

The grouping of stones in the Japanese garden is placed in such as way to reflect triangular shapes. Source of water in a Japanese garden should form part of the natural surrounding and lanterns are placed near them to represent male and female part of the elements fire and water.

More Gardening Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.